The Obama Presidency: A Case of Double Standards

Article written for ByBlacks.com

As then President-Elect Obama planned his transition to the White House, the challenges facing the United States were overwhelming. 800,000 jobs were being lost per month with an unemployment rate approaching 10%.

The Auto Sector, which employs thousands – was facing a dire financial situation. The Finance and Banking sectors were dealing with the consequences of sub-prime lending. In addition to the economic recession, the United States was involved in two wars that cost thousands of lives and and billions of dollars. Welcome to the Whitehouse, Barack Obama.
While no leader is perfect, it is hard to deny that America and the world economy has improved from the Great Recession of 2008. The American economy has produced over 75 consecutive months of job growth. Obama led many reforms on Wall Street, small business financing, and investments in new industries while increasing America’s energy independence.
20 million Americans now have access to health care due to the Affordable Health Care Act (known as ObamaCare). This has helped stabilized Medicare funding for years to come.
However, if you listen to much of the debate across North America (including Canada) – you’d think nothing has changed since 2008. The key question normally asked after any political leader serves out their term is: “Are we better now than we were 8 years ago?”By all measures, America is better. Not perfect, yet it is better. But Mr. Obama’s legacy is already being attacked by many as if they forgot about 2008.
Let’s go back to 2008. If Mr. Obama was the CEO of a Fortune 500 company that was losing market share, with revenues decreasing rapidly, no innovation agency and profitability shrinking – he would be under constant pressure from shareholders. Now fast forward to 2016. If that same company under his watch improved market share, increased sales, invested in R&D/innovation, and increased profitability by almost 70% – he would be hailed as a brilliant CEO. Mr. Obama would be in line for massive stock options and bonuses. Mr. Obama would be a compared to similar CEOs who turned struggling companies around.
Yet, so many continually attack him. Right wing/conservatives have a list of complaints about Mr. Obama. And many on the left would have liked to see more aggression towards Wall Street and some more drastic shifts in foreign policy.
But the double standard that Mr. Obama has had to deal with is all too familiar to many Black Canadians and Americans. How many times are we put in a near impossible situation, deliver positive results yet are still criticized? How many times have we been punished for taking risks where many of our colleagues are rewarded? How many times are we labelled as rude, arrogant, cocky when we speak of our accomplishments, whereas our colleagues are viewed as confident. And yes, Canadians – we are talking about our experiences in Canada as well.
The difference in how many view President Obama vs. President-Elect Trump – is proof of this double standard. The fact that the President of the United States receives little credit for getting America out of the worse economic crisis since the 1930’s – is a reflection of the double standard many Black Canadians/Americans face in their day to day lives.
Despite this constant double standard, Mr. Obama has continually demonstrated class, elegance and a sense of humour. For that, both he and Mrs. Obama deserve respect and admiration from all of us

 

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How many Donald Sterling’s are destroying the lives of Blacks in North America?

Excuse me, as I am sure there are a million blog posts about this topic.  But I figured I would add my two cents.

When TMZ.com released the Donald Sterling audio this past weekend, many were shocked to hear such blatant racism come from an accomplished business/sports personality.  Perhaps even more shocking to many, was the fact that he displayed racism towards the very same group (Blacks/African Americans) who just happen to represent the majority of his team, and league.

Note, this is not the first time Sterling has had ‘race’ problems.   Dan Wetzel of Yahoo Sports highlights this in a recent article

Obama speaks on Sterling remarks
Obama speaks on Sterling remarks

However for many of us who are Black, this is neither shocking or surprising.   Instead, what Sterling has done is underline what many of us feel – That no matter our skill & education level, many in power view us Blacks as inferior being who shouldn’t think, talk or action unless we have permission from our ‘masters’.

This mindset is often found online when the topic surrounds race or ethnicity right here in Canada.   When Blacks speak up on an array of issues, many will speak to us as if we have no right to have an opinion.  The common line of “Freedom of Speech” in invoked, however it is only freedom of speech when THEY have an opinion, not us.

The problem becomes larger however if those behind the keyboards are also the same individuals sitting in the Executive Offices of various places of employment.  As we posted in a previous blog – a job is how many of us regardless or race/gender, provide for our families.   If the people who control your employment have the same attitude of a Donald Sterling or many of these “keyboard haters”, then we start to see racism transform from not only a social issue but an economic one.

At least we know where Sterling stands on this issue as it relates to Blacks.  The deeper concerns are as follows:

  • Why did the NBA wait for this event to happen when Sterling has a history of demonstrating this behaviour?  Why has the NBA protected him for so long?
  • For every Sterling, how many more people in power have this view towards Blacks?
  • How many qualified Blacks are overlooked for promotions, new opportunities and business ventures due to racism?
  • If multimillionaire NBA players who bring in millions for the league and sponsours can be looked upon in this manner, how are everyday, hard working blacks viewed?

From Sterling’s comments, to the racist backlash against President Obama – an increasing amount of blacks at all socioeconomic levels are seeing their worst fears confirmed.   The fear is that even if we are contributing to society; are we still viewed as modern day slaves?

Some will argue that Affirmation Action/Employment equity is making a difference.  However, even TIME Magazine in a recent article mentions that it is not Blacks reaping the benefits of Affirmation Action.

There are millions of people who adore the NBA and its players.   Basketball is a beautiful sport and has helped transform many lives.   Many of those millions are Blacks who work hard and contribute to our society.   Are they getting a fair shake at work?  Are their kids getting fair shake at school?

Maybe we don’t feel the need to speak about this issue because after all, we are “multicultural”.   But as a Black Man born and raised in Canada, I don’t see multiculturalism in the hall of power.  Or even in our media nearly enough.

I would rather deal with someone who is honest about not liking me than with someone who poses with pictures of Elton Brand yet makes disgusting comments like this to this girlfriend about Blacks.  I just wonder, how many Donald Sterling’s are out there and how many lives of good hard working Black People are they destroying?

 

Blog by Radcliffe Dockery

 

 

 

 

State of Black Canadians – Facts vs. Fiction!

The Black Community in Canada is vibrant and growing!    In 2013, a group of some of the best black minds in Canada came together to put gather statistics about Black Canada.   One of the most interesting statistics destroys the stereotypes that Blacks are “dependent” on Government.   Below are some highlights from the report.

T1888571_513005795481101_2089841211_nTaken from the Report Titled, “Toward a Vision for the Black Community”

Successful black people are remembered as having paler skin, study claims

Successful black people are remembered as having paler skin, study claims

Disturbing study posted from the Daily Mail today..  The study looks at how “successful” Blacks are viewed.   While we can debate what “successful” means, the findings of this report would not be a surprise to many Blacks.  Within the Black Community itself we often see a Black person in a white collar job called “white washed” or “sell out”.

However, in this study the real concern is how those who are in power to make decisions regarding employment, procurement, elections and promotions view Blacks.   If that “Successful” Black person is viewed a ” exception to their race”, what does that mean for other Black people?

And what does this say about Blacks who may not have a Masters yet have an undergrad degree and has developed an innovative business?   Would they get a fair shot?   I would like to see more studies on this matter but  during my 16 year career in Corporate Canada, I do some merit in this study.