3 Things The Black Community Should Demand From Justin Trudeau

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Published by ByBlacks.com

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3 Things The Black Community Should Demand From Justin Trudeau

On Monday, October 19th – Justin Trudeau won the first Liberal majority in 15 years.
His team ran a well-executed campaign which led to the Liberals winning 184 seats. This also marks the first time in Canadian history that a son/daughter of a former Prime Minister will occupy 24 Sussex Drive. Mr. Trudeau will officially become Canada’s 23rd Prime Minister on November 4th.

Now that the election is over, it is time for the Black community to consider what we should demand from the new Liberal majority government. Obviously the community will hope to see Celina Caesar-Chavannes, named to a Cabinet post. Her resume combined with winning in the riding of the late Finance Minister, Jim Flaherty should lead to her being rewarded with a Cabinet post. That being said, there are three areas we should focus on in relation to our new government.

1) Accessible Public Transit
The Liberal platform promised to increase funding for public transit by 4 times. While public transit is vital for all Canadians, it is probably even more important for the Black community. In a report titled, Towards a Vision for the Black Community , the data showed that 36.6% of the Black population depended on public transit vs. 11.5% of the general population. This obviously highlights the need for increased investment in public transit. However, public transit projects must be improved in areas where the Black community lives and works. For instance, the York University Subway Extension will benefit York university students however the bus routes within Jane & Finch and the surrounding areas are still impacted by poor service.

The cities of Brampton and Ajax have fast growing Black communities that will require building more transit that connects the 905 region to Toronto proper. Announcing billions in new transit is a good start. Ensuring that the routes proposed improve the daily commute where Black people live is the important next step. This is one of the criticisms of John Tory’s Smart Track Plan for Toronto. The Toronto Pearson Airport to Union Express (UP) has run into a problem of accessibly due to cost. Public transit that is not accessible due to price or location is of no use to us.

2) Equal and Fair Access to Government procurement
The Government of Canada purchases $15 to 20 billion worth of goods and services every year. The Liberal platform will add to this, as it proposes significant investments in Canada’s infrastructure. For social infrastructure, the Liberals will invest $20 billion over 10 years. This will focus on affordable housing and child care spaces. In addition, $6 billion will be spent on Green Energy Infrastructure over the next 4 years. Overall, the Liberal infrastructure platform is being hailed as historic.

With these high levels of infrastructure spending, the Black community must ensure that Black businesses are able to bid and win contracts with the Federal Government. Black businesses that are skilled in delivering goods and services that provide direct or indirect support for infrastructure must be given the opportunity to win contracts. This will require a diligent and intensive lobbying effort. In today’s economic climate, it is often very difficult for small businesses (much less Black businesses) to do business with the Federal Government. The firms who tend to win Federal Government Business are large firms with effective lobbies. To fix this issue, the Trudeau Government should set aside a portion of its investments for small businesses as well as businesses owned by visible minorities. This is already being done in the United States via the Minority Business Development Agency (MDBA).

During the campaign, Mr. Trudeau was clear about the fact that Canadians need good paying jobs. The Minority Business Development Agency has done that in the United States. “During the first three years of the Obama Administration, MBDA facilitated a total of over 16,300 new jobs — an increase of 20% over the prior 3-year period.”

Naysayers who stand against the concept for set asides for minority run businesses should also note that “Between 2009 and 2011, MBDA achieved a return on taxpayer Investment (ROI) between 102x and 130x.” This agency was created by Republican President Richard Nixon.

3) Practical Skills Development Training
To ensure that the Black Community has the skills to deliver value in areas such as infrastructure, technology, social, health etc. – the community must demand fair access to training. Not just post-secondary education, but also practical on the job training and apprenticeships. Thus, the Black community should demand that any new infrastructure project funded by the Government of Canada include on the job training for Black youth and those re-entering the workforce.

For instance, the York Subway project that extends into Vaughan should be providing practical training opportunities for Black youth who reside in the surrounding areas. All funding should have this condition attached. From the building of new affordable housing in Peel Region, to upgrading information technology infrastructure to increasing funding for social agencies – all Federal Government funding commitments must include training opportunities for Black people. Too often others reap the financial and training benefits of projects within the Black community, and not those who are actually living there. This is outrageous and must stop.

The first step towards change is the vote for it. The next steps are much more difficult. It involves various members of the Black community creating effective lobby groups. It is time to focus on how we can directly benefit from increased Government Investments. Prime Minister Designate Trudeau’s reference to former Prime Minister, Wilfred Laurier “Sunny Ways” indicates that he is open to new ideals from all Canadians. It is time for Black Canadians to be a vital part of that conservation.

Too often we say we want change yet we have not changed our tactics. Real Change starts within. Let it begin right now!

An Entrepreneur’s Thoughts — in a plane ride bite size snack!

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Social Media to Social Business

While flying to Dallas, I sat beside a serial entrepreneur!  He shared some interesting points with me that were impactful in his quest for entrepreneur success — of which he has had at least 3 successful exits!

Here’s what I drew as I talked to him!

plane funnel

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Carly Fiorina as a boss: The disappointing truth

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This is from Fortune Magazine folks, not me!

Fortune

Fresh from strong debate quips, Carly Fiorina has improbably raced from 14th to fifth place in the New Hampshire Republican primary polls and now enjoys a 70% favorability rating in Iowa, ahead of such career politicians as Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio, John Kasich, Rand Paul, Chris Christie, Rick Perry, George Pataki, and Lindsay Graham.

It is time to take her candidacy seriously and examine her leadership record. Having never held elected office, she has staked her reputation on her business career.

Fiorina is eager to be seen as the answer to Democratic slogans of a Republican war on women. She’s often been erroneously referred to as the first woman to lead a Fortune 500 firm, Hewlett-Packard [fortune-stock symbol=”HPQ”]. That title actually belongs to The Washington Post Company’s Katharine Graham. Then there are the many other trailblazing women leaders preceding Fiorina, including Beechcraft’s Olive Ann Beech, Mattel’s Ruth Handler, Beatrice…

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Canadian economy has ‘limited power,’ as small business confidence drops to lowest level since April 2009

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This is a major concern for the Canadian economy. Small businesses do most of the hiring in Canada and are vital for our competitiveness globally. This will surely become a major election issue.

Financial Post

OTTAWA — The mood of small business operators has deteriorated to a post-recession low in Canada, and though it has been concentrated in the centre, there are signs the malaise is spreading farther across the country.

In fact, confidence in the economy is at its lowest level since April 2009, when Canada was still shaking off the effects of the global economic downturn, according to a monthly survey by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, released Thursday.

It’s also the first time in the past six years that the CFIB’s Business Barometer — a key indicator of economic health that is closely watched by government policymakers — has fallen below the zero-growth mark for gross domestic product, or the 59.8 level.

For July, the reading was 58.2, down 1.2 points from the previous month, a sign of growing pessimism over Canada’s ability to growth over the next few months.

“Canada’s…

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Why I cut off my Locs and the politics of Black Hair

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On Father’s Day, I posted a picture on my Facebook profile of my daughter and myself.   At her daycare, they were having a small father’s day celebration where the toddlers designed a gift for Dad.

Nia Rad

Well this led to my Facebook inbox blowing up.   Not only due to the fact that my daughter is beautiful (yes I am very biased) – but due to the fact that I removed my locs.   All of the sudden, I am getting offers to attend various churches.   The assumption there is that I did this for religious reasons and that I am no longer an ‘evil’ rastaman.

On the other side, there are some who now believe that I am no longer interested in the forward progression of the Black community in Toronto because I cut of my locs.   Or in other words, “I am conforming to White Supremacy”.

The purpose of this blog post is to hopefully eliminate these misunderstandings and to avoid having to respond to every inbox message individually!

The cutting of my locs represents letting go of the past, and moving forward.

The decision to grow my locs was made in 2002.   I was progressing fairly rapidly in my career as an IT Sales Professional.   At the same time, my political and social views were evolving.   I became more aware of issues surrounding diversity and equality.   This came mainly from volunteer sessions with young people across the Greater Toronto Area.

Growing my locs had little to do with a conversion to Rastafarianism.  I am influenced by certain philosophies that are core to Rastafarianism such as the respect for Africa, knowing one’s self and understanding the spirit that connects us all   Locs were also worn by Ancient Egyptians.  In 2002, during a trip to Egypt with Kemet Nu Productions, I saw this first hand when I saw this Pharaoh with locs in the Cairo Museum.

Instead, I grew my locs in hopes of enabling personal growth.  My locs were a test for me.  A test of my resolve, my strength and my ability to overcome challenges.  I also noticed that my locs became a source of inspiration for many people, in particular young black men who never saw any Black Male in a Professional position, much less a Black Male with locs.

2009 - Beating the Odds Conference Waterloo

2009 – Beating the Odds Conference Waterloo

The other large test was going to be aimed at Corporate Canada.  With all of the talk surrounding diversity and equality, my locs would help determine if all of this talk was hype or reality.   How would Senior Leaders in Corporate Canada deal with a professional black male with locs?   Overall, I found that most Senior Executives had no problem with my locs at all.   They were focused on the value that I would deliver for their organization.

It was middle managers and peers who seemed to have a larger problem with my locs.   As I was told once by a middle manager, “…. you scare a lot of middle managers because when you are in front of an Executive you deliver your message much more effectively than most of us… which means you are a threat.”   

Turns out they were right about my ability to deliver a message.   With my locs, I was interviewed on Canada’s Business News Network-BNN, TVO – The Agenda, CBC NewsWorld, 1010 CFRB and ran a political blog with the Toronto Star for the 2011 Provincial Election.

Overseas, I had wonderful professional experiences with clients based out of Malaysia, Thailand, China, Mongolia, Indonesia, Botswana, South Africa  and Nigeria.

Delivering a workshop in Malaysia

Delivering a workshop in Malaysia

Unfortunately, my most disappointing professional experiences were with leaders in Jamaica or within Caribbean populations here in Canada. Too many Senior leaders in Jamaica had the negative stereotype of locs cemented in their minds. Turns out that in retrospect, that many Jamaicans out of Jamaica have this problem, locs or not.   But that is another topic for another time.

There came a point 2 years ago where the thought of removing my locs starting to enter my mind.   I recalled a conversation with the first stylist, Ruth years before this point.  We were talking about why R&B artist India Arie cut her locs off.   While the patrons at Ruth’s style studio – Strictly Roots, were clearly upset, Ruth stated the following:

“You need to understand why someone cuts off their locs.  The removal of your locs is a serious matter.   The decision normally surrounds a life changing event(s) and/or a deeply personal spiritual matter.   It is a matter of personal, spiritual and mental resurrection.  So don’t  judge why someone grows or cuts off their locs. “

Here was the premier natural hair stylist in Toronto standing up for India Arie in this case.   Where most stylist would have ranted like we did, Ruth did not.   My future stylist,  Glen would repeat Ruth’s thoughts many times.   I would like to thank them both for their friendship and for playing key roles in my growth!

Ruth and Glen – the only individuals allowed to touch my locs!

While facing some very serious challenges and life changing events, I seriously considered cutting my locs off.   However, more challenges of an urgent variety continued to mount.   There was actually no opportunity to prepare myself mentally to go ahead and remove years of history that were represented in my locs.

However, after overcoming these challenges with the help of family, friends and other good hearted people – I finally found the spiritual/mental space.   I made the decision to remove my locs on June 6, 2015.  The number 6 and 13 have played significant roles in my life. Thus the date of June 6th seemed appropriate.

So no, I am not looking to change my faith nor am I now a tool for White Supremacy.

The cutting of my locs represents letting go of the past, and moving forward.  It represents a fresh new start, and an appreciation for the ups and downs of life.  Life will have more tests and challenges and I am ready for them.

On to the next chapter of this journey called life.

Blog Post by Radcliffe Dockery

Employers watch what you do online — and you should too

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Financial Post

The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion; and so let all young persons take their choice.

—William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair (1848)

Welcome to the new funhouse called “social media,” where the lines are blurred between our professional and private lives. We put our music, movies, pictures, purchases, politics and morning lattes on display for the entire world. We present meta versions of ourselves with irony, wrapped in social commentary, often shrouded in a thin parchment of sarcasm.

For most of us, social media reflects the inconsequential fluff of life. Cat videos and memes and that amazing stir-fry you made just before you set the kitchen on fire. What could it matter? Who could possibly…

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